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Episode 152  |  07:36 min

#152: Seeking Wisdom Is Back: How Disruption Leads to Opportunity

Episode 152  |  07:36 min  |  08.31.2020

#152: Seeking Wisdom Is Back: How Disruption Leads to Opportunity

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This is a podcast episode titled, #152: Seeking Wisdom Is Back: How Disruption Leads to Opportunity. The summary for this episode is: Seeking Wisdom is back! During this 25-episode season, David Cancel shares what he wishes he knew when he was younger – and the stories behind the lessons – to help you avoid making the same mistakes. But first, in this very special episode, DC shares his thoughts on the COVID pandemic, how to pull out silver linings when possible, and why massive external events can trigger personal and professional behavioral changes. And why that just might be a good thing for you and your business. Like this episode? Be sure to leave a ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ review and share the pod with your friends. You can connect with DC and his co-host, Adam Schoenfeld, on Twitter @dcancel @schoeny @HYPERGROWTH_Pod.

Seeking Wisdom is back! During this 25-episode season, David Cancel shares what he wishes he knew when he was younger – and the stories behind the lessons – to help you avoid making the same mistakes.

But first, in this very special episode, DC shares his thoughts on the COVID pandemic, how to pull out silver linings when possible, and why massive external events can trigger personal and professional behavioral changes. And why that just might be a good thing for you and your business.

Like this episode? Be sure to leave a ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ review and share the pod with your friends. You can connect with DC and his co-host, Adam Schoenfeld, on Twitter @dcancel @schoeny @HYPERGROWTH_Pod.

Speaker 1: Okay DC why are you back?

DC: All right. So I'm back on Seeking Wisdom. It's been a long time and I can't even remember the last time that we did a Seeking Wisdom. I'm back for a number of reasons. Foremost, I'm back because of the Seeking Wisdom community. Seeking Wisdom community has been DMing me, has been tweeting at me, has been sending us, collectively, messages for a very long time now asking us to bring back the show. I didn't know anyone was listening and now I know people are listening and they miss the show. So that's first. And then second, my personal mission is to try to help people go through this journey by ideally saving them from making some of the same painful mistakes that I made by sharing all the problems and messes that I've gotten myself into with them. So hopefully some small percentage of them will be saved from learning through pain and misery the way I did. And then the third reason is that it's somewhat therapeutic. Doing Seeking Wisdom and talking about some of these ideas, to me clarify in my own mind and my own thinking, these ideas that I'm wrestling with. There's a community motivation. There is a selfish motivation in this. And so we have all bases covered.

Speaker 1: The world's changed a little bit since the last episode, hasn't it?

DC: Yeah the world is turned upside down. And so we all know, and we all have gone through all the negative repercussions of what, or at least so far though I'm sure there's many more to come, of what has happened through this pandemic. And it's forced a lot of us to change our minds on some stuff that we held kind of dear and near for a long time, including myself. But it also has, for many, opened up a whole new way of thinking and new opportunities. In our own world in what we do at Drift, we believe that it's fast forwarded the adoption of digital, of what people call digital transformation by at least 10 years by enterprise companies who, before this pandemic, could rely on physical events and physical marketing and offline marketing and visiting customers and steak dinners and all that stuff and it's all gone out the window. And they've been forced to adopt the digital reality that the rest of the market lives in and we as consumers live in. And so when there's massive disruption and change like that, it's massive opportunity for lots of companies out there. So some exciting stuff, some depressing stuff, lots of things have happened.

Speaker 1: Boom. Well, it's those external trends you always talk about, right? And certainly a lot of external trends for us to talk about or bring back the principles that you were sharing in Seeking Wisdom and come back to this and come back to your personal mission to help people learn faster than you did.

DC: Yeah I think that is one of the exciting things. And again, so much of this is awful and negative and so many people have been impacted deeply by this so I don't want to make light of that. But when there is massive disruption, including negative disruption, like what are occurring now, that is when change of behavior happens. And when behavior changes, which is very hard to do as humans, right? We talk about cognitive biases and this human decision- making all the time. It's almost impossible to have behavior change really stick. But when something external to us happens like this that forces all of us collectively to go through a massive behavior change, there's so many opportunities up and down the stack for us to think about and to read, look at how we do business, how we live our lives, how we learn. And so I want people to try to pull the silver lining out of this if they can. I know it's hard that there is massive disruption in change. And if you can focus and find the areas of change that affect you and your business, you might be able to use that to grow bigger than ever before.

Speaker 1: So you mentioned learning. We're going to do 25 episodes on things you wish you knew when you were younger. Why didn't you know these things when you were younger?

DC: Stubborn, I'd say stubborn as a mule. I didn't know them as I'd say most of them I actually had heard of. And this is an important distinction. Most of the important lessons that we need to learn in life I believe we have been told by different sources, whether it's family, friends, educators, early in our lives. But even though we heard them, we did not know them. We did not internalize them. We did not believe them for whatever reason. In my case, you can say it's stubbornness of wanting to learn everything on my own, thinking that I had a better solution, thinking that things were different now than they were before, not realizing that we are still humans who have not evolved. And so things are not actually that different than they were when my parents were my age or my grandparents or great, great, great, great grandparents were. And so because of that, we have failed to learn the lessons of history and we're doomed to repeat those lessons over and over again.

Speaker 1: Love it. So what do you hope people will take away from these podcasts about the things you wish you knew when you were younger?

DC: So the reason I shared them was that I wanted again to hopefully share my journey, hopefully help people who are earlier along in their career and their life to not make those same mistakes. And I think sometimes you need to hear the same message from very different messengers. Someone will say a message in such a way that will resonate to you even though you may have heard that message 300, 000 times before, but it's just that person maybe has the context, maybe a credibility in your life, or maybe they've said, it in the way that they worded it, that really hit you. And then I'm hoping to appeal to some small sliver of people who may have heard these things before, but maybe I say it in just the right way for them to be able to believe it, internalize it, and learn from it and not have to repeat those failures on their own.

Speaker 1: I love it. For me personally, I'll say just about all the things you wrote down in what you wish you knew when you were younger, my grandfather or my great grandma have told me those things, or I've read them in a book. So I'm looking forward to digging into them and getting your take and hoping that that works for me. Maybe one of these will get through my thick skull finally.

DC: I agree with you. You've heard it from your grandmothers and your granddad and other people in your life. And so have the rest of us. We've heard from them but we haven't really internalized it. And I think one of the most dangerous things that you can tell yourself is the words," I already knew that." When you catch yourself saying," I already knew that," or," I know that," or," I already know that," that should be a danger sign in your mind. That should be a red flag to stop and actually really consider whether you actually do know it or you have just simply heard it before.

Speaker 1: So my job here is going to be to try to help put down and pull some of this out of your brain so that everybody can internalize, integrate these ideas.

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