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Episode 18  |  12:29 min

18: The Grind: Why You Have To Put In The Work

Episode 18  |  12:29 min  |  06.21.2016

18: The Grind: Why You Have To Put In The Work

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This is a podcast episode titled, 18: The Grind: Why You Have To Put In The Work. The summary for this episode is: If you liked this episode, we bet that you’ll love our blog content. blog.drift.com/#subscribe Subscribe to never miss a post & join the 20,000+ other pros committed to getting better every day. --- Chances are, you’re not going to be the next Instagram or What’s App. If you really want success, you need to be ready for this: success is going to take years of grinding and putting in the work day in and day out. The overnight success stories? Those are great Business Insider headlines. The four hour work week? That’s a great way to sell you a book. And that’s why today on Seeking Wisdom, we have a few words to say about the grind. Follow David (twitter.com/dcancel) and Dave (twitter.com/davegerhardt) on Twitter. Catch all of the previous episodes of Seeking Wisdom: http://seekingwisdom.io/ The book we mention on this episode is Shoe Dog: A Memoir by the Creator of Nike. *We're both in separate places this week so had to record over Skype if your audio isn't as pristine as it usually is :)
If you liked this episode, we bet that you’ll love our blog content. blog.drift.com/#subscribe Subscribe to never miss a post & join the 20,000+ other pros committed to getting better every day. --- Chances are, you’re not going to be the next Instagram or What’s App. If you really want success, you need to be ready for this: success is going to take years of grinding and putting in the work day in and day out. The overnight success stories? Those are great Business Insider headlines. The four hour work week? That’s a great way to sell you a book. And that’s why today on Seeking Wisdom, we have a few words to say about the grind. Follow David (twitter.com/dcancel) and Dave (twitter.com/davegerhardt) on Twitter. Catch all of the previous episodes of Seeking Wisdom: http://seekingwisdom.io/ The book we mention on this episode is Shoe Dog: A Memoir by the Creator of Nike. *We're both in separate places this week so had to record over Skype if your audio isn't as pristine as it usually is :)

DC: Yes. So what we're talking about of seeking wisdom is the one secret that you already know that can make you successful. All right.

Speaker 2: So the one secret that you already know that can make you successful. I have an obvious question for you, right away, if everybody knows this, why are we talking about it?

DC: Because they know it deep down, and when they hear it, it'll hit them. They'll know it, they'll feel it, but they don't want to do it.

Speaker 2: All right. What is it?

DC: The secret is being successful requires sacrifice. Simple right? Now you're all turning your dials, you're all shutting down seeking wisdom now. You're all going off to something else because nobody wants to hear the hard truth, which they know deep inside. And if you look at anybody who's successful, whether it's in sports, whether it's in business, whether it's in the arts, whether it's in personal life, whether it's in family life, you know that in order for them to be successful, you've seen it. They've had to put in the sacrifice. But no one wants to hear that.

Speaker 2: What? Okay, so this is something that people know, but like what got in your ear recently that made you want to talk about this? Is it just something you've been seeing? I know you hate shortcuts and that type of stuff. Is it something you've been seeing a lot that made you want to bring this up again? Or is it just a good reminder?

DC: I think it's a good reminder. I've been seeing things and I always see people either asking me directly or seeing them chasing, trying to find the 0. 001% optimization. Right. And you see it happen around you each and every day. And the more that you know and you live this" secret" the more that kind of stuff hits you in the side of the head. And you just want to yell, if you could just get inside of your thick skull, you already know the secret. You already know what you need to do. And it's not four work weeks. It's not shortcuts. It's not hacks. It's not any of this stuff. But the only people who ever tell you about that stuff are people who are trying to sell you something. Dave and I are not trying to sell you anything. Right. They're trying to put butts in seats, in seminars, they're trying to sell books. They're trying to sell info products, videos, white papers, docs. They're trying to sell books. That's the only person who's going to tell you" you don't have to make sacrifices," that it's easy.

Speaker 2: You know what the other thing that you just made me think you mentioned optimizing. I think that what gets a lot of people today, they spend so much time analyzing and optimizing and that they, that to them is they think that's the grind.

DC: Exactly. They think they authored the searching and the optimizing and even reading, which I love, is the grind, but it's not, it's the application. They don't want pull the trigger. They don't want to go out there and actually do it.

Speaker 2: Yeah. And so this is feels personal to me because this is something that you and I talk about a lot, just as like the stage of the company that we're at and trying to grow something is, every, I have to always remind myself like every time every week or every day, if I get lost in some like Google analytics hole or whatever, or little things. I always have, I am reminded that if I just forgot all of that little optimization stuff. Because of the stage that we're at and I just focused on making one or doing one or two big things that week, the result is always, it makes me laugh every time because it's so obvious. But let's just say, for example, I didn't look at any spreadsheets. I just deleted all that stuff for a week. I didn't look at any numbers, any metrics. And I just focus on creating the next awesome piece of content, for example. If I reopened that dashboard, the next Monday, the results would be so obvious.

DC: So obvious. And now that I think about it, there were two things that kind of triggered this thought this morning. And it was yesterday someone reminded me about, we had a new person starting a team and she said," oh, I heard about The One Thing," the book that everyone here reads. And I thought, oh yeah, I need to get her a copy. So I started thinking back about The One Thing, which we've talked about before, which is focusing on the big rocks. Second thing that happened yesterday was I spoke to a friend of mine who's a kind of CEO of a company that's about probably a hundred employees. And you know, first thing he said to me was why is this so fucking hard? Right. And that's how he answered the phone. Right? Why is this so hard? I'm like, it is hard, man. You forget about it until you're back in. And it's hard, but nobody wants to hear that in some ways he can't say that to anybody else that it is so hard.

Speaker 2: It's so hard. And so I'm reading, you read it and now I'm reading it. And I think a lot of people listening, if you like this podcast and you'll like the Phil Knight, he's the founder of Nike, this book called Shoe Dog. And you and I have been talking about it a lot. So we've probably mentioned on this podcast, but I'm out right now and I'm almost done with the book and it's really, he has, so this guy built Nike, he grew the company to over$ 20 million in sales and they still almost went under after 20 years. And, so people think of Nike and they think of, maybe this guy just got lucky and had this idea, but if you people think that Nike existed before like Michael Jordan in the eighties, but it was basically two decades of Phil Knight and these five other guys just grinding every single day to get them to, A to B to C. And the thing that he said, even later, even when they're doing multi- million dollars in sales, he said so many times they would look around the room and just kind of laugh at each other because nobody knew what they're doing. They're just all figuring it out as they go. And I think that made me, that was a good lens for me because it made me realize okay, yeah, I do marketing, you're product guy, you're CEO, we have a sales person, like every individual job. There's only a certain amount of experience that actually matters until you're actually in the thick of things. And then you can just throw all that out because we're all having to basically relearn everything as we go. And as we apply it to Drift.

DC: How amazing is that book, man? I just kept smiling reading it.

Speaker 2: It's so good because it's just like everything you feel like you can relate to.

DC: Yeah. When you're in the grind you identify with so much of it and everything that he's talking about right there is what we're saying here, which is the secret is right there. Look how hard he had to work, look how many years he had to sacrifice. Look how many times he almost went out of business, look at how many times he had to borrow money from his dad, from the bank, begged banks to be able to create. That is a man, the$ 28 billion man who deserves it. Right. Who actually sacrificed to win, but nobody wants to hear that part.

Speaker 2: The other thing that he does is, he talks about how, do you just don't ever have, you're never operating with all the information and all the answers. So their example is Hey, we're going to open up a new factory in New Hampshire. Right. And most people would be like well, why, how are we going to know what's the exact business plan? How are we know we're going to get our, what's the ROI going to be? What's the actual math on the whole thing. And there's just like, there's some things, especially in the early days of starting a company that you just have to, you just have to do them. And it's hard because a lot of people don't think that way. They want to think very analytically and say like, okay, if I put X amount of dollars in, what am I going to get out? And it just doesn't always work out to be perfect math. It's a lot of times gut over data.

DC: Yeah. And one of the greatest and worst things that has happened to us in these generations is the internet, right? Is the ability for us to search endlessly spend days, weeks, months, years on the sideline, not pulling the trigger, right. Phil had no way to understand how to do any of this stuff. He had to go door to door, bank to bank. And the only banks he could use were the banks in his hometown. And he had to borrow from them for years. And he had no other options just had to figure it out. How do we build a factory? Like you said, in New Hampshire? Don't know, let's go figure it out. How do we open a store in LA? I don't know, send this guy, convince this guy to go move there and have him figure it out. That's how businesses get started. Even today. That's how you have to suspend disbelief and you just have to will it to happen. But now where we have so much information but so little wisdom that we are drowning and we don't want to pull the trigger and we want to overanalyze. And especially us engineers and MBA or doctors are, and lawyers are the worst, right? Because they want everything to equal out on a nice Excel spreadsheet. And that's not life.

Speaker 2: Right, that's not life. And I think, the quote that I always think about is the Mike Tyson quote," Everybody has a plan until you get punched in the mouth." And that's exactly what it is. Right? Yeah, you can create this amazing plan, but the second that you get into market and something happens differently, this is kind of what we're, we're dealing with now, right? Like at Drift, we've started to see this like movement and this rally around some of the stuff that we're doing. And so we're starting to think more about okay, we're not married to the initial vision. We're starting to think more about where every day is moving on the fly.

DC: Yep. And you've got to be able to thrive in it in some ways. It's uncomfortable. crosstalk

Speaker 2: The other thing was, we've talked about this, like Jason Lemkin book a bunch, and he has a good thing where at the end of that book, he talks about advice for people who really think they want to start a company. And he says can you go 24 months just without any money, without anything, because that's really what it might take. And what it does take is two years of searching and then in the Nike scheme of things, two years doesn't seem like that long, but that's a good lens I think for him to look at that.

DC: Yeah. I love that lens. I love being able to look at it that way. And yeah. Once you read that Phil Knight book, you think, wow, we've got it easy.

Speaker 2: Yeah. So I don't know. What's our takeaway from today that everyday you just kind of show up, put in the work.

DC: Every day, show up, put in the work, and kind of suspend disbelief. Right. And know that you have to grind, stop searching for those, the easy door, the easy exit, the easy button that doesn't exist. Just put in the grind and we'll grind alongside you. And together we can make this happen.

Speaker 2: Actually I have one more thing I want to ask you. So you've done a bunch of companies. I think five, what, do you feel the same? Does it feel the same way every time? Every time you're reminded that it's just the grind? Like there's no magic switch in any of those.

DC: Yeah. You know, I know. Yes. I know the answer and I know what it's going to feel like. And every time you're like fuck this is hard. This is what this guy who started other companies, I was talking to him last night, inaudible he's got a nice sized company now startup a hundred people, like I said, and that was the first five minutes. I wasn't even talking during first five minutes. He is like, oh, why is this so hard? This shouldn't be this hard. And it doesn't seem like it would be hard on paper. And then you're in it. And even a memory because we forget about the hard times. And even when everything is going great, and you have customers and money and this and that, and you're like, damn this shit is hard. And that's why people give up. crosstalk

Speaker 2: Yeah. Or, who knows? You get to 10 million ARR and then your two best employees leave or you lose your biggest customer, it's just always going to be something.

DC: It's always something. And that's why most people don't do it. Even if they want to do it, they don't do it because it's too freaking hard.

Speaker 2: Right. So keep grinding. That's our lesson for today.

DC: Keep grinding and we'll grind with you.

Speaker 2: All right. And keep grinding. And then also go to seekingwisdom. io, catch up on all the previous episodes that we've done. Leave a review. Those always make DC especially happy.

DC: It makes me super happy. And we're doing something where we're all of our new episodes and old episodes are now available on YouTube. So you can find them on our Drift channel. And there's a playlist called learn with Drift. Come learn with us.

Speaker 2: Awesome. All right. I'll catch up with you later.

DC: See ya.

Speaker 2: See ya.

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